Currant Recipes

Browse our list of currated recipes featuring some of the fresh produce that we offer.

Red Jam

Red Jam

It’s perfectly fine to use frozen fruit for jamming! Remember to measure the fruit while still frozen & firm, then thaw to crush.
Active time: 20-30 minutes
Total time: 70 min
Yield: 3 cups/750 ml, approx.

red-jam-4

Ingredients

  • 2 cups red currants, destemmed (ok if the occasional tiny stem remains)
  • 2 cups pitted whole sour cherries
  • 1 cup small, or quartered, hulled strawberries
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar

Instructions

  1. In a large saucepan or dutch oven, at least 10/25cm dia., crush the fruit. I like to use a potato masher. Avoid using a food processor, as the motorized blades tend to crush the seeds, and the resulting jam tastes seedy”.
  2. Add the sugar, stirring to dissolve.
  3. Set the mixture aside for at least 30 minutes, or up to overnight. This is called macerating, and allows the juices from the fruit to combine with the sugar. Cover the pan to keep out bugs and dust.
  4. This next step is OPTIONAL, but I prefer my jam mostly seedless. Crush the fruit mixture a bit more with the masher, then push the mixture though a medium mesh sieve to remove the seeds. Return the now smooth fruit/sugar mixture to the saucepan.
  5. Heat the mixture over high heat, stirring occasionally, until it comes to a boil. Reduce heat slightly, to maintain a (not too violent) boil. Cook the mixture, stirring occasionally, until very thick. A spoon drawn across the bottom of the pan should leave a trail, into which the mixture does not flow immediately.
  6. Remove from heat, and let stand 5 minutes without stirring. Stir the mixture to distribute fruit, and then ladle into clean containers. Cool and then cover and store your jam in the fridge, for up to 1 month.
  7. For longer term storage, process the jam using standard water-bath canning procedure, for minimum 10 minutes.

Home Canning for High-Acid Foods

Introduction

Home canning is not complicated. It is a simple procedure that applies heat to food in a closed glass jar to interrupt the natural decaying that would otherwise take place. The air we breathe and all foods in their natural state contain microorganisms, such as molds, yeasts, bacteria and enzymes. Food spoils when these factors are not controlled. Proper, safe home canning procedures control the growth of spoilage microorganisms allowing us to keep food beyond its normal storage period.

Heating the filled jars is the only way to change the atmospheric pressure, thus creating a vacuum seal that will keep your treasured contents safe.

The heat processing method, according to up-to-date tested home canning guidelines includes:

  1. Placing prepared food in mason jars that can be sealed airtight with a two-piece metal SNAP ® LID closures.
  2. Using the correct type of canner to heat the filled jars to a designated temperature for the food being processed.
  3. Maintaining this temperature for the time specified in up-do-date, tested recipes to destroy spoilage mircoorganisms, inactive enzymes and properly vent air from jars.
  4. Cooling jars properly to allow lids to form a strong vacuum seal

Use only current, tested home canning recipes that:

  • Include the appropriate heat processing method and time for the food and mason jar size.
  • Designate head space for the food and jar size.
  • Come from reputable source that uses the jars and lids that you are using today.

You will need:

  • Only the best, top quality ingredients. For best results, preserve ingredients at it’s peak of freshness.
  • A currant, tested home canning recipe.
  • Mason Jars
  • Two-piece SNAP LID ® closures
  • Large, deep, non-reactive pot to prepare recipe (i.e. stainless steel or glass)
  • A water-bath canner OR large deep pot, at least 3/8 cm deeper than the jars you are using.
  • Rack or folded towel for bottom of canning pot
  • Common kitchen utensils – measuring spoons and cups, long handled spoons and spatulas, funnel, a ladle or handled cup to transfer recipe to jars.
  • A place to set filled jars after processing: area on the counter away from drafts, and where jars can remain undisturbed for several hours. Protect the warm jars from thermal shock by placing a folded towel or newspaper on the counter first.

Black Currant with Thyme

This small batch jam balances spicy thyme with tart currants and the acidity of white wine. Serve along side cheese or as a relish for pork, chicken or eggs. The set of this jam is very firm, so, when cold, could be sliced or scooped. For a softer jam decrease cooking time. Have ready 6 x 125 ml, or 3 x 250 ml jars.

ACTIVE TIME: 30 min TOTAL TIME: 40 min

Servings

Makes about 2 1/2 cups, (750 ml)

Ingredients

  • 4 cups (1 L) destemed black currants, or a combination of black and red currants
  • 1 cup (250 ml) granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) white wine, preferably dry or off-dry
  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) white wine vinegar
  • handful of fresh thyme sprigs

Instructions

  1. In a 10-12″ (30cm) skillet or dutch oven, mash the currants with the sugar. Set aside, covered, for at least 30 min, and up to overnight.
  2. Add the white wine and white wine vinegar. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat just enough to maintain a boil, and cook, uncovered, until mixture will form a gel, about 8 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from heat.
  3. Select a large pot which is at least 4 (10cm) taller than your jars. Set a cooling rack, tea towel or canning rack into the bottom, add water to half full, filling the jars with water. Bring to simmering. Set screw bands aside; heat lids in hot water, NOT boiling (180F/82C). Keep jars and lids hot until ready to fill. If your lids are newer (post 2014 purchase) pre-heating is not required.
  4. Remove the jars from the pot of water, setting onto a towel on the counter. Ladle hot jam into the hot jars to within 1/2 inch (1 cm) of top rim (headspace). Using nonmetallic utensil, remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rim removing any stickiness. Centre lid on jar; apply screw band securely & firmly until resistance is met fingertip tight. Do not overtighten. Place jars back into the pot of water. If the last jar is less than 3/4 full, do not process, but store in fridge for immediate use.
  5. Cover the pot; bring water to a boil. Boil filled jars 10 minutes. When processing time is complete, turn heat off and remove canner lid. When boil subsides – bubbles no longer rise to surface (3 to 5 minutes) – remove jars without tilting. Cool jars upright, undisturbed 24 hours. DO NOT RETIGHTEN screw bands.
  6. After cooling, check jar seals. Sealed lids curve downward and do not move when pressed. Remove screw bands; wipe and dry bands and jars. Store screw bands separately or replace loosely on jars, as desired. Label and store jars in a cool, dark place.

Black Currant Blueberry Jam Basil

An exotic combination of lime leaf and Thai basil provide a perfect foil for tart currant and sweet blueberry. The set of this jam is quite firm. For a softer jam decrease cooking time.

ACTIVE TIME: 30 min TOTAL TIME: 40 min

Makes about 2 1/2 cups, (750 ml) Have ready 6 x 125 ml, or 3 x 250 ml jars

blue-jam-4

Ingredients

  • 280 gm black currants, or a combination of black and red currants
  • 280 gm blueberries
  • 280 gm granulated sugar
  • 8-10 fresh lime leaves, or 1 tsp grated lime zest
  • 14 gm Thai basil

Instructions

  1. In a 10-12 (30cm) skillet or dutch oven, mash all the ingredients together. Set aside, covered, for at least 30 min, and up to overnight.
  2. Bring mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat just enough to maintain a boil, and cook, uncovered, until mixture will form a gel, about 8-10 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from heat. Using tongs, or a fork, remove leaves and stems from jam. It’s ok if tiny leaves (smaller than your baby fingernail) remain.
  3. Testing for gel (2 methods)
    a. Place a small plate/saucer in the freezer before you start cooking your jam. When you think the jam is nearing your desired thickness, remove the plate from the freezer. Drop about 1/2 teaspoon (3 ml) of the jam onto the cold plate, tilting the plate slightly. The jam will cool quickly to indicate thickness.
    b. Remove the pot from the burner. Draw a large spoon through the jam mixture. If the jam is thick enough to gel, the spoon will leave a trail into which the jam does not flow quickly (see photo)
  4. Select a large pot which is at least 4 (10cm) taller than your jars. Set a cooling rack, tea towel or canning rack into the bottom, add water to half full, filling the jars with water. Bring to simmering. Set screw bands aside; heat lids in hot water, NOT boiling (180 F/82 C). Keep jars and lids hot until ready to fill. If your lids are newer (post 2014 purchase) pre-heating is not required.
  5. Remove the jars from the pot of water, setting onto a towel on the counter. Ladle hot jam into the hot jars to within 1/2 inch (1 cm) of top rim (headspace). Using nonmetallic utensil, remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rim removing any stickiness. Centre lid on jar; apply screw band securely & firmly until resistance is met fingertip tight. Do not overtighten. Place jars back into the pot of water. If the last jar is less than 3/4 full, do not process, but store in fridge for immediate use.
  6. Cover the pot; bring water to a boil. Boil filled jars 10 minutes. When processing time is complete, turn heat off and remove canner lid. When boil subsides – bubbles no longer rise to surface (3 to 5 minutes) – remove jars without tilting. Cool jars upright, undisturbed 24 hours. DO NOT RETIGHTEN screw bands.
  7. After cooling, check jar seals. Sealed lids curve downward and do not move when pressed. Remove screw bands; wipe and dry bands and jars. Store screw bands separately or replace loosely on jars, as desired. Label and store jars in a cool, dark place.